Greenhouse Construction | Choose the Best Greenhouse Site PART 2

* This is part two of a two-part article about “Greenhouse Construction”. Part one can be found here.

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Here come the rest of the considerations we’ve mentioned previously. Please check them out!

 

– Anything that blocks sunlight from reaching your greenhouse interior that you cannot control or change is defined as a light obstruction. Houses and other structures on someone else’s property; a hill or slope; trees or hedges owned by a neighbor; trees or shrubs on your own property that you prefer to keep — all would this criteria. Keep in mind that the ideal location for a greenhouse would be free of these obstructions. However, finding a location completely free of obstacles will he practically impossible for most gardeners, especially those living in urban or suburban areas.

The location of these obstacles is very important. Obstructions located to the south and east of the greenhouse are most detrimental since they block the main concentration of sunlight. Obstacles to the west of the greenhouse are usually tolerable since they block the later rays of sun which are hotter and can damage plants.

One way to test a site is to plot out the dimensions of the greenhouse with rope or wooden strips. Watch this outline for a day or two to see if any major shadows fall into it. If there is serious light blockage, maybe you should look for another location. If this is the only possible greenhouse site on your property, consider installing artificial lights. Still another solution would be to grow shade-loving plants.

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

– Many climatic regions have severe weather problems. A greenhouse in a location that is sheltered from these weather problems will be more economical to run and less likely to be damaged during storms.

The heavy rainfall or snowmelt can cause drainage problem around your greenhouse. To avoid this problem, you should provide a drainage system or choose a site for greenhouse construction on high, well-drained ground. If heavy rains occur in your area frequently, you may need a gutter system on the eaves of the greenhouse to control the runoff.

Too much strong wind can be a problem as well — especially in cold weather, strong wind can lessen the heat inside the greenhouse. Planting windbreaks is a great idea to break up the force of the wind. (But, please note that a windbreak can obstruct light, too. Do not plant windbreak where it will totally block the sunlight.) Growing trees or shrubs or installing openwork fences will also serve admirably. An openwork windbreak lets the wind blow through it in an erratic manner, actually lessening the wind’s force.

In case snow is a problem in your region, just provide adequate insulation and heating. Avoid placing your greenhouse a low spot or a sheltered area where snowdrifts could build up. If sleet and hail are problems, a hard plastic roof is recommended rather than glass or soft plastic.

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

Greenhouse Construction

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